The Caribbean Climate Change Exchange (Live Stream and Updates All Evening)

caribbeanclimate

2015 is shaping up to be a landmark year for global action on Climate Change. The future of the Caribbean depends on a binding and ambitious global agreement at COP 21.
A bold agreement that curbs greenhouse gas emissions to limit the global rise in temperature to below two Degrees Celsius  is needed to safeguard our food, critical industries such as tourism, infrastructure and promote renewable energy.

The live-stream of the Caribbean Climate Change Exchange will begin at 8pm (-6 GMT). Bookmark this page to watch the proceedings live and learn what this means for the Caribbean.

Stay tuned for the Agenda, Speakers’ Guide, Programme and more…

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Watch the Live Stream of the Climate Change Exchange on July 30!

caribbeanclimate

2015 is shaping up to be a landmark year for global action on Climate Change. The future of the world, in particular the Caribbean, depends on a binding and ambitious global agreement at COP 21 to be held in Paris later this year.
A bold agreement that curbs Greenhouse Gas (GhG) emissions to limit the global rise in temperature to below 2°C is needed to safeguard our survival, food, water, critical industries such as tourism, infrastructure and promote renewable energy.

Live Stream

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Battlefield Casualties, Action Man: Wet pants and weeping soldiers, the reality of joining up

Carol Anne Grayson (Radical Sister) blog

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The bloody and painful reality of war depicted in Darren Cullen’s

“Battlefield Casualties: Action Man”

If you have ever seen a video of the Taliban targeting NATO forces in Afghanistan it is not a pretty sight. It usually involves an IED (Improvised Explosive Device) and an RPG (Rocket Propelled Grenade) and shows soldiers catapulted several feet into the air, limbs blown from bodies or burnt alive in a vehicle death trap. The sounds of “Allahu Akbar” (God is Great) rises with every kill and why wouldn’t they cheer, the Taliban are after all defending their home territory from an occupying force… wouldn’t Britain do the same? Occasional close-ups gleefully filmed by the militants show blood-drenched soldiers cowering in terror, some so afraid they have urinated on themselves, others crying like babies being comforted by fellow recruits. That is the reality of war.

This is the side that artist Darren Cullen aims to…

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Photographing Palestine: Life and Hope

Palestine Square | ميدان فلسـطيـن

Palestine Square does not own any of the following photographs and full credit belongs to the photographers. The purpose of the article is to highlight and promote the work of Palestinian photographers who bear witness to their people’s struggles and aspirations. Many of these photographers have collections outside of historic Palestine, but we have chosen to focus on those photographs within the original borders of Palestine.

Majd Hadad. 

Issawiya village near Jerusalem. Photo Credit: Majd Hadad. Issawiya village near Jerusalem. Photo Credit: Majd Hadad.

Dead Sea. Photo Credit: Majd Hadad. Dead Sea. Photo Credit: Majd Hadad.

Dome of the Rock and replica. Photo Credit: Majd Hadad. Dome of the Rock and replica. Photo Credit: Majd Hadad.

Ahlam Shibli is a Palestinian citizen of Israel whose work, although international in scope, often focuses on unrecognized Arab villages in the Israel. 

Peace and Love (Palestine, 2000). Photo Credit: Ahlam Shibli. Peace and Love
(Palestine, 2000). Photo Credit: Ahlam Shibli.

Tal al-Saba’a (Goter no.13), al-Naqab (2002 – 2003). Photo Credit: Ahlam Shibli. Tal al-Saba’a (Goter no.13), al-Naqab (2002 – 2003). Photo Credit: Ahlam Shibli.

Trackers (2005). This collection photographed Palestinian-Israeli citizens who serve in the IDF. Photo Credit: Ahlam Shibli. Trackers (2005). This collection photographed Palestinian-Israeli citizens who serve in the IDF. Photo Credit:…

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America Has Lost Its Way

The Contrary Perspective

It still waves, but for how long? It still waves, but for how long?

By Graciela Huth.  Introduction by Michael Murry.

Graciela (Grace) Huth calls herself “an old woman.” She says that she writes as a form of therapy, “to unload my anger and avoid having a stroke due to what is going on today in the USA.” Yet her long life of good citizenship and community activism testify to a youthful spirit that cannot rest content with mere complaint but must somehow find a way to change the world for the better. Her long years of down-to-earth experience infuse her writing with directness and simplicity. If this is “old,” then, indeed, “youth is wasted on the young.”  Michael Murry

America Has Lost Its Way

Graciela Huth

I am an old woman. Nowadays I feel that all my life I have been not a citizen but a serf of the USA. I worked all my…

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New Energy Outlook 2015

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

By 2040, the world's power-generating capacity mix will have transformed: from today's system composed of two-thirds fossil fuels to one with 56% from zero-emission energy sources. Renewables will command just under 60% of the 9,786GW of new generating capacity installed over the next 25 years, and two-thirds of the $12.2 trillion of investment. • Economics – rather than policy – will increasingly drive the uptake of renewable technologies. All-in project costs for wind will come down by an average of 32% and solar 48% by 2040 due to steep experience curves and improved financing. Wind is already the cheapest form of new power generation capacity in Europe, Australia and Brazil and by 2026 it will be the least-cost option almost universally, with utility-scale PV likely to take that mantle by 2030.

• Over 54% of power capacity in OECD countries will be renewable energy capacity in 2040 – from a third in 2014. Developed countries are rapidly shifting from traditional centralised systems to more flexible and decentralised ones that are significantly less carbon-intensive. With about 882GW added over the next 25 years, small-scale PV will dominate both additions and installed capacity in the OECD, shifting the focus of the value chain to consumers and offering new opportunities for market share.

• In contrast, developing non-OECD countries will build 287GW a year to satisfy demand spurred by economic growth and rising electrification. This will require around $370bn of investment a year, or 80% of investment in power capacity worldwide. In total, developing countries will build nearly three times as much new capacity as developed nations, at 7,460GW – of which around half will be renewables. Coal and utility-scale PV will be neck and neck for additions as power-hungry countries use their low-cost domestic fossil-fuel reserves in the absence of strict pollution regulations.

• Solar will boom worldwide, accounting for 35% (3,429GW) of capacity additions and nearly a third ($3.7 trillion) of global investment, split evenly between small- and utility-scale installations: large-scale plants will increasingly out-compete wind, gas and coal in sunny locations, with a sustained boom post 2020 in developing countries, making it the number one sector in terms of capacity additions over the next 25 years.

• The real solar revolution will be on rooftops, driven by high residential and commercial power prices, and the availability of residential storage in some countries. Small-scale rooftop installations will reach socket parity in all major economies and provide a cheap substitute for diesel generation for those living outside the existing grid network in developing countries. By 2040, just under 13% of global generating capacity will be small-scale PV, though in some countries this share will be significantly higher.

• In industrialised economies, the link between economic growth and electricity consumption appears to be weakening. Power use fell with the financial crisis but has not bounced back strongly in the OECD as a whole, even as economic growth returned. This trend reflects an ongoing shift to services, consumers responding to high energy prices and improvements in energy efficiency. In OECD countries, power demand will be lower in 2040 than in 2014.

• The penetration of renewables will double to 46% of world electricity output by 2040 with variable renewable technologies such as wind and solar accounting for 30% of generation – up from 5% in 2014. As this penetration rises, countries will need to add flexible capacity that can help meet peak demand, as well as ramp up when solar comes off-line in the evening. More

 

 

Climate Change and Moral Responsibility – NYTimes.com

On Tuesday, the British medical journal The Lancet will publish a landmark report highlighting the inalienable and undeniable link between climate change and human health.

We warmly welcome the report’s message of hope, which confirms the fact that climate change is more than just a technical or financial challenge (as Pope Francis did in his encyclical letter on June 18) and confirms the voice of health in the discussion on climate change. Indeed, the central premise of the Lancet commission’s work is that tackling climate change could be the single greatest health opportunity of the 21st century.

It is no surprise that climate change has the potential to set back global health. The greenhouse gas emissions that are warming our planet come from industrial activity that pollutes our air and water, and the temperature changes may lead to drought that brings malnutrition. Those with little or no access to health care — children and the elderly in particular — are more vulnerable to such predicaments.

However, health is symptomatic of a larger problem, which undermines and fragments our broader worldview. In addition to highlighting the effects of climate change, we must address the root of the problem. In so doing, we will discover how the benefits of assuming moral responsibility and taking immediate action — not just on matters related to health, but also world economy and global policy — far outweigh the cost of remaining indifferent and passive.

It is this vital link that The Lancet’s report conclusively and authoritatively demonstrates. In short, it proves that our response to climate change — both in terms of mitigation and adaptation — will reduce human suffering, while preserving the diversity and beauty of God’s creation for our children. God’s generous and plentiful creation, which we so often take for granted, is a gift to all living creatures and all living things. We must, therefore, ensure that the resources of our planet are — and continue to be — enough for all to live abundant lives.

The report could not appear at a more significant and sensitive time in history. This year, as all eyes look ahead to the Paris climate negotiations and as governments prepare to sign a universal commitment to limit global temperature rises, we have reached a critical turning point. We are — as never before — in a position to choose charity over greed and frugality over wastefulness in order to affirm our moral commitment to our neighbor and our respect for the Earth. Basic human rights — such as access to safe water, clean air and sufficient food — should be available to everyone without distinction or discrimination.

Because of our faith in God as creator, redeemer and sustainer, we have a mission to protect nature as well as human beings. The obligation of all human beings is to work together for a better world, one in which all human beings can flourish; our Christian vocation is to proclaim the Gospel inclusively and comprehensively.

To this purpose, as early as the mid-1980s, when the faith-based environmental movement that has come to be known as creation care was neither political nor fashionable, the Ecumenical Patriarchate initiated pioneering environmental initiatives. In 1989, it established a day of prayer for the protection of the natural environment and, from 1991 to this day, instigated a series of symposia and summits on an international, interfaith and interdisciplinary basis. Its ecumenical and ecological vision has been embraced in parishes and communities throughout the world.

In 1984, the Anglican Consultative Council adopted the Five Marks of Mission, the fifth of which is: “To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation, and sustain and renew the life of the earth.” In 2006, the Church of England started a national environmental campaign, Shrinking the Footprint, to enable the whole church to address — in faith, practice and mission — the issue of climate change. In 2015, a clear direction has been set for the Church of England’s national investing bodies in support of the transition to a low-carbon economy that brings its investments into line with the church’s witness.

As representatives of two major Christian communions, we appeal to the world’s governments to act decisively and conscientiously by signing an ambitious and hopeful agreement in Paris during the United Nations’ climate conference, COP 21, at the end of this year. We hope and pray that this covenant will contain a clear and convincing long-term goal that will chart the course of decarbonization in the coming years. Only in this way can we reduce the inequality that flows directly from climate injustice within and between countries.

The Lancet report is further proof that all of us must act with generosity and compassion toward our fellow human beings by acting on climate change now. This is a shared moral responsibility and urgent requirement. Civil society, governmental authorities and religious leaders have an opportunity to make a difference in a way that bridges our diverse opinions and nationalities. More