Suriname’s fisherfolk agree to form national fisherfolk association to partner with decision-makers

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CRFM media release

Fisherfolk leaders from five fishing communities in Suriname agreed to form a national fisherfolk association within the next year to strengthen their voices in fisheries governance.  The national fisherfolk association would seek to engage with the Fisheries Department and other key stakeholders in the development and implementation of fisheries and related policies, legislation and Draft Fisheries Management Plan that would enable sustainable development of the fishing industry.  The fishing industry is one of the top five contributors to the GDP in Suriname, but it has been plagued by high fishing pressure and illegal fishing in recent years.

“An association will help us to better help ourselves,” said one of the 12 fisherfolk leaders attending the final two-day national fisherfolk workshop in Suriname, that is part of the four-year project Strengthening Caribbean Fisherfolk to Participate in Governance.  “I am happy that the fisherfolk are finally coming out [to meetings] and…

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Sandals and Guy Harvey Team-up To “Save Our Seas”

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Source: caribjournal Source: caribjournal

The Sandals Foundation, the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, and CARIBSAVE (INSTASAVE Caribbean) have teamed up to launch an initiative called the Save Our Seas Program in Ocho Rios, Jamaica.

The project will be implemented in the curricula of 40 schools across the region and will work on developing marine awareness and environmental stewardship.

“The people of the Caribbean have relied on the ocean for centuries but have never necessarily grasped the impact they have on its wellbeing,” said Sandals Foundation Director Heidi Clarke. “By teaching the next generation to understand how their actions affect the marine ecosystem and give them ownership of its wellbeing we can hopefully make a much needed change.”

Some of the program’s features will include marine awareness videos, posters, lesson plans, activity books, and competitions.

The lesson plans, which will be directed at students in grades 6-8, have been designed to promote interactive and…

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Climate Change, the Pope and the Caribbean

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In a little over a month’s time negotiators from around the world will gather in Paris to try to reach a final and globally binding agreement on a new treaty on climate change.  It is no exaggeration to say that achieving this is of existential importance to the Caribbean.

The meeting, from November 30 to December 11, will be the largest since 2009 when a similar attempt in Copenhagen failed, only to be followed by recriminations between the developed world, advanced developing nations, and those countries most at risk, over who was to blame.

Since then the process has moved on and the positions of many nations, most notably the United States and China, have become closer. One general reason for this is that the two countries among many others have since the Copenhagen summit agreed to regulations, policies or laws that now enable them to make specific pledges on…

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Caribbean Nations Are Preparing For Paris Climate Talks

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Flooding in Dominica during Tropical Storm Erika. Experts say the Caribbean is already reeling from more intense storms. This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Caribbean-Nations-Threatens-to-Walk-from-Paris-Climate-Talks-20150928-0008.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english Flooding in Dominica during Tropical Storm Erika. Experts say the Caribbean is already reeling from more intense storms.

Negotiators and ministers with responsibility for climate change have ended their meeting in Saint Lucia determined to make their demands heard in Paris. Saint Lucia is responsible for climate change issues at the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) level, and the island is bringing together climate change negotiators from the member states to cement its plan for addressing issues during negotiations in Paris in December.

Chief Sustainable Development and Environment Officer, Crispin D’Auvergne says the Caribbean has a lot at stake in the upcoming deliberations, as more and more developed countries are trying to sway the outcome in their favour.

“In view of how the negotiations are going right now, some countries are saying we don’t want ‘this’ in the new agreement, others are saying we want ‘that’ or we want it this way. What are…

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Hope, Dear, Debt and Paranoia – By Albert Bates

Hope, fear, debt and paranoia have been recurrent themes running through our past month as we traversed the northwest corner of the European continent through Iceland, Britain and Denmark.

Iceland is the country that told the world its bankers are not too big to jail and it will not be blackmailed by London, Bonn, or the European central banks. It is still taken to the woodshed regularly and reminded who is in charge. Icelanders are not free to leave their country or to take money with them if they are allowed to go.
Britain is Europe's bad boy, master of every latest Ponzi scheme and constantly one step ahead of collapse, eking astonishing profits as all about her topple and fall. Denmark is a dreamweaver, whose sheer powers of imagineering seem to emanate an aura that can warp reality. With nothing but fairy dust to back its notes and debts, it is poised to test the durability of its famed social capital when placed in the vice grip of open imigration. Like many former bastions of European liberalism, it has taken a hard swing to the right and is getting set for the clown show that follows.
The United States is far along down the circus trail, having starved its science, educational and social programs for decades while feeding its population a steady diet of numbing pharmaceuticals, mind-rotting television, high fructose corn syrup and GMOs, until they can be readily induced in their coma to vote against their own interests, over and over, producing a government of popular lunacy — clownocracy — a Mad Hatter's Tea Party overseen by Donald Trump, as Queen of Hearts; “a sort of embodiment of ungovernable passion – a blind and aimless Fury” (description by Lewis Carroll).
Debt is a theft of the options of future generations. To escape debt and claw their way back from penury people will rape, plunder and pillage every last sacred resource, leaving not an inheritance but a ruin. Cascading debt may sweep much of civilization away, perhaps in Jubilee, but the damage will have been done to foundations — and be visited as ecosystem death. Every dollar that cannot possibly be repaid in sweat and hours becomes a drain on Earth's operating system. We grew giddy wealthy on our energy slaves. Don't look now, but they just left and winter is coming.
Obstruction is an occupational hazard we accept because we are in the business of bringing hope, otherwise labeled permaculture, or ecovillage, but we are frequently obstructed and overpowered by those other three elements — fear, debt and paranoia. From time to time we break through enough to peer over the horizon and see what might yet be.
Fear and paranoia are what drive the security state apparatus we encounter most closely and personally when we stand in long lines at airports and then let some gentleman we have only just met fondle our genitals. Of course, we could avoid having our genitals fondled if we would agree to placing ourselves in front of his death ray for a few milliseconds. We know that a few milliseconds won't kill us on the spot but its like buying a ticket in the cancer lottery, and we go through airports often so if we didn't do this fondling ritual we might soon have a shoebox full of such raffle tickets, and who knows? We might win.
Research suggests that anywhere from six to 100 U.S. airline passengers each year may be getting cancer from the machines. Still, any time you opt out, some brainwashed TSA officer will try to persuade you that scanners are “safe,” or equal to “less than three minutes of air travel,” glossing over the fact that even the lowest doses of ionizing radiation — the kind beamed directly at the body by the scanners and qualitatively not much different in the non-ionizing radiation of millimeter wave devices — will increase your lifetime risk of cancer and inherited damage to your offspring, increasing your and their susceptibility to hundreds of genetically related diseases and disabilities.
It is refreshing to go through airports in Europe and not have to go through these machines because they are banned in Europe and would have been banned in the United States had the scientific or medical community made the call. As it was, the call was made by apparatchiks who skipped the legally required public comment period before deploying the scanners, and bypassed the Food and Drug Administration by waving their Patriot Act, and then, in defending these cruel devices, relied on a small body of unpublished research to insist the machines were safe, ignoring contrary opinions from U.S. and European authorities that recommended precautions, especially for pregnant women. Rapiscan employed Chertoff Group, founded by Homeland Security Nomenklatura Michael Chertoff, to make sure the government worked for them. More

Assessors of Full Applications [Technical Assessment Committee], Local Adaptation Measures (LAMs) Grant Scheme

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The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) has received financing from the German Development Bank (KfW), toward the cost of implementing the Coastal Protection for Climate Change Adaptation in the Small Island States in the Caribbean Project and intends to apply a portion of the proceeds of this financing to eligible payments under this Contract for three (3) Individual Consultants for the above-referenced Consultancy. The overall objective of the consultancy is to assist the CCCCC in the selection of the best proposals received under our Call for Proposals Local Adaptation Measures Grant Scheme to achieve a high-quality, complete and coherent selection process of projects in line with the criteria set out in the Guidelines for Applicants.

Interested eligible applicants may obtain further information from the CCCCC’s Office from September 25, 2015 to October 20, 2015 Mondays through Fridays from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. The Complete Terms of Reference…

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Regional climate change meeting held in Saint Lucia

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Climate-change-how-does-it-work

PRESS RELEASE – The Ministry of Sustainable Development, Energy, Science and Technology in collaboration with the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) and the High Level Support Mechanism (HLSM) hosted a regional meeting for climate change negotiators and ministers with responsibility for climate change from Wednesday 16th September, 2015 to Friday 18th September, 2015 in Saint Lucia.

The meeting, which was requested by Prime Minister, Hon. Dr. Kenny D. Anthony, at the last meeting of CARICOM Heads in Barbados, had three objections:

  1. Establish coherence among negotiators on the critical issues in the negotiations toward a new climate change agreement in Paris in December 2015;
  2. Apprise of the areas of convergence and divergence in the ongoing climate change negotiations;
  3. Prepare Ministers for a meeting of the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS) in New York today, Thursday ,24th September, 2015. The meetings is taking place on the eve of the Post…

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Pax Americana – Or Not Noticing American Bases

It's not that I knew nothing about U.S. military bases before I met Chalmers Johnson.

In certain ways, my idea of the good life had been strongly shaped by such a base. Admittedly, it wasn't in Germany or Japan or South Korea or some other distant land, but on Governor's Island, an Army base just off the southern tip of New York City. In the 1950s, my father ran a gas station there. On Saturday mornings, I would often accompany him to work on a ferry from downtown Manhattan and spend a dreamy suburban-style day there amid zipping Jeeps and marching troops and military kids, playing ball, wandering freely, catching cowboy or war flicks at the island's only movie house, and imagining that this was the best of all possible worlds. And yet between that moment and the moment in September 1998 when Johnson's proposal for a book to be called Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire fell into my editorial hands, I probably never gave our country's bases another thought.

In that, I was like millions of Americans who, as soldiers or civilians, had cycled through such bases at home and around the world and never considered them again. And we were hardly alone when it came to the hundreds and hundreds of foreign garrisons that made up what Johnson termed our “empire of bases.” Historians, political scientists, and journalists, among many others, paid them little mind. Our overseas garrisons were seldom discussed or debated or covered in the media in any significant way. No one in Congress challenged their existence. No president gave a speech about them. Though I hesitate to use the term, there was something like a conspiracy of silence around them — or perhaps a sense of discomfort that they even existed led everyone to act as if they didn't. And yet they were the face of this country to significant parts of the world. In their profusion and their reach, they represented a staggering reality for which there was no historical precedent. Billions and billions of dollars poured into them. Hundreds of thousands of troops and their dependents were stationed on them. It should have told us all something that they were quite so unremarked upon, but until Johnson came along, they were, in essence, not so much our little secret as a secret we kept even from ourselves. As he wrote with a certain wonder in the second book in his Blowback Trilogy, The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic, “The landscape of this military empire is as unfamiliar and fantastic to most Americans today as Tibet or Timbuktu were to nineteenth-century Europeans.”

Johnson broke the silence around them — repeatedly. And yet, in an era in which such bases, still being built, have played a crucial role in our various wars, conflicts, bombing and drone assassination campaigns, and other interventions in the Greater Middle East, they remain a barely acknowledged aspect of American life. Why this is so should be considered both a curiosity and a mystery. Is it that a genuine acknowledgement of the existence of a vast network of global garrisons would lead to uncomfortable conclusions about the imperial nature of this country? I'm not sure myself. That they remain largely surrounded by an accepted and acceptable silence, however, continues to be an American reality.

Thank heavens, then, that, almost five years after Chalmers Johnson's death, David Vine has produced a groundbreaking new book, Base Nation: How U.S. Military Bases Abroad Harm America and the World, which should once again bring that empire of bases back into the national discussion. Today, in “Garrisoning the Globe,” Vine offers an overview of what it means for this country to continue to encircle the planet with such bases 24/7. Posted: 09/14/2015 By Tom Engelhardt More

 

 

America’s Overseas Military Bases: The 51st State

The Contrary Perspective

The true American Flag? The true American Flag?

W.J. Astore

As David Vine reports for TomDispatch.com, the U.S. has roughly 800 military bases in foreign countries. Maintaining these bases costs upwards of $100 billion each year, more than the federal government spends on U.S. education.

The sheer extent and cost of these bases got me to thinking.  Each base is basically a “little America,” with a few of those bases being large enough to constitute an American city. If we can envision them collectively, would they not constitute America’s 51st state?  But instead of adding one more star to the American flag, we’d have to add a white Pentagon to the field of blue to represent the controlling interest of “base world,” our 51st state.

Fifty stars and one Pentagon: Or, if you prefer, 51 stars arranged in the shape of a Pentagon.

Sound crazy?  Not when you consider “base world’s” population, its corporate…

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LAC Carbon Forum Calls for Including Market Approaches in Paris Agreement

11 September 2015: The 9th Latin American and Caribbean Carbon Forum (LACCF 2015) concluded with calls for the use of market-based mechanisms and other forms of carbon pricing and climate finance to be included as mitigation and development tools in the global climate agreement expected to be adopted at the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 21) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).


The Forum, which took place from 9-11 September 2015, in Santiago, Chile, was organized by the World Bank Group, the Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE), the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA), the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and the UNEP DTU Partnership, the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB), the UNFCCC Secretariat, the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the Development Bank of Latin America (CAF).


It brought together key business and government representatives and other stakeholders from across the Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region to share, among other things: the most recent developments on carbon pricing, climate financing and green investments in LAC; and best practices and lessons learned from the implementation of the CDM in LAC.


The Forum provided a platform to showcase successful examples of the use of market-based approaches such as the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), innovative financial instruments, and carbon pricing policies in the region. Discussions at the Forum also highlighted the need to bridge the gap between public and private sector actions so as to leverage the finance needed to address climate change in the region.


The Forum concluded, inter alia, that the expected Paris agreement should not overlook any mechanism that could be used to put the LAC region and the world on a low-carbon development pathway. [UNFCCC Press Release] [UNEP DTU Press Release] [LACCF 2015 Website] More