Windrush scandal caused by ‘30 years of racist immigration laws’ – report

The origins of the Windrush scandal lay in 30 years of racist immigration legislation designed to reduce the UK’s non-white population, according to a leaked government report.

The stark conclusion was set out in a Home Office commissioned paper that officials have repeatedly tried to suppress over the past year.

The 52-page analysis by an unnamed historian, which has been seen by the Guardian, describes how “the British Empire depended on racist ideology in order to function”, and sets out how this affected the laws passed in the postwar period. 

It concludes that the origins of the “deep-rooted racism of the Windrush scandal” lie in the fact that “during the period 1950-1981, every single piece of immigration or citizenship legislation was designed at least in part to reduce the number of people with black or brown skin who were permitted to live and work in the UK”.  https://bit.ly/3Gvn3MW

Farm vehicles have become so heavy they’re affecting the world’s soils

Vicki Robin—NYT best-selling author, Post Carbon board member, and host of our What Could Possibly Go Right? podcast—says:
“If global supply chains are disrupted, we need more local food and local energy. The question isn’t how can corporations feed the world, but how can our  laws and institutions increase the ability of regions to feed themselves?”

What do you think? How do we convince our lawmakers that building #communityresilience and investing in #localization efforts are our BEST avenues forward?

Farm vehicles have become so heavy they’re affecting the world’s soils
May 17, 2022: The total weight of farming machinery has increased tenfold in the last 40 years, as machines become bigger and stronger. As they operate across fields, these machines slowly crush the soil and make it harder for plants to grow, risking reducing harvests across global cropland in the next decades, a new study found.
The average weight of modern agricultural machinery (36,000 kilograms or 80,000 pounds) exceeds by far the heaviest living terrestrial animals (the African bush elephant, which has a maximum body mass of 8,000 kilograms). Modern tractors are even heavier than some of the sauropod dinosaurs, the heaviest land animals that ever walked on Earth. 

Cayman drops way down on TJN secrecy ranking

Cayman drops way down on TJN secrecy ranking – 

 CNS): The Cayman Islands is no longer the Tax Justice Network‘s most secret jurisdiction. The British overseas territory was rated number one in 2020 and number two in 2021, but this year it has dropped way down to number 14. The United States is now number one, Germany is number seven and Britain itself is number 13. The TJN said that Cayman dropped to 14th place in this year’s rankings after disclosing data showing that the scale of financial services it provides to non-residents was lower than expected.
The TJN has turned its attention to the onshore larger economies and, as successive governments and the financial services sector here have consistently claimed, it found that they are just as secretive as offshore jurisdictions, which TJN has previously viewed as traditional tax havens. It also found that it is in those countries where the serious financial crime is occurring.  Read More

Are Hawaii and the Cayman Islands being sold to the global elite?

Are Hawaii and the Cayman Islands being sold to the global elite?

For over a century, the destiny of this island paradise has been in the hands of outsiders. Now native Hawaiians are reclaiming their culture, language and land. 

“Hawaii is being sold to the global elite. It’s not give and take. It’s just take, take, take, take.”  Filmmaker Chris Kahunahana 
“They took it away in three generations. We’re going to get it back in one. Whatever it takes.” Waterman Pomai Hoapili. 
It’s a slice of paradise for some but behind the postcard façade, native Hawaiians have a different story to tell.  
Theirs is a stuggle for land, language and culture, forcibly taken from them by the United States of America. 
Housing prices in Hawaii were already sky high, but in the midst of the pandemic they exploded as mainland Americans bought up island boltholes. The housing crisis is hitting native Hawaiians hardest, forcing many out of their own homes. The state of Hawaii now has the third highest homeless rate in the USA. 
This is one of many problems facing native locals who are fighting to ʻKeep Hawaii Hawaiian’. 
Reporter Matt Davis visits the Hawaiian Islands to hear from the people fighting to keep their culture alive. In a visually stunning journey, Davis explores the lives of people on the frontline of this modern-day native Hawaiian rennaisance. 
“Resistance is not only how we get our land back,” says school principal Kalehua Krug. “But it is also medicine – that resistance is how we heal.” 
At his school on the island of Oahu, the curriculum focuses on redsicovering the modern story of Hawaii after the kingdom was overthrown in 1893. The students study the Hawaiian language, hula dancing and other cultural practices alongside the mainstream curriculum.
 Davis takes a tour around the back streets of Waikiki with celebrated filmmaker Chris Kahunahana, the first native Hawaiian to direct a feature film.  
“Hawaii was seen as Hollywood’s back drop. It served as a beautiful location for a Caucasian centred hero,” he tells Davis.  His movie Waikiki shows the darker side of these tropical islands – the reality for many native Hawaiians. 
Davis visits the powerhouse community leader Twinkle Borge who has set up a permanent camp to provide shelter for Hawaiians who are sleeping rough. She reveals an extraordinary plan to reclaim land and build a village for her community. 
And he goes out on the jet ski with waterman Pomai Hoapili in the middle of the worldʻs most famous surfing competition – the Pipeline Pro. 
Between surfing on the North Shore and rescuing people caught in the giant waves, Pomai has enrolled in Hawaiian language classes. He practices speaking with his 10-year-old daughter, who’s also learning.  He says it’s urgent for native Hawaiians to practice their culture. 
“Be Hawaiian, speak Hawaiian live Hawaiian…If we stop down the line, people stop talking about us, we disappear…we’ve got to keep practicing.” 
In Hawaii to compete in the Pipeline surfing competition, the world’s most famous  surfer Kelly Slater asks the world to pay respect. 
“Everyone who comes Hawaiian should, should take care of this place and really respect the culture and the locals,” says Slater. “It’s their home and it’s your place to visit, but, you know, take care of it and look after it and ever one can enjoy it.” 

Watch the Video

Coastal Fire Shows Even the Rich ‘Are Not Safe From Earth Breakdown’

Coastal Fire Shows Even the Rich ‘Are Not Safe From Earth Breakdown’

 As a fast-moving brush fire near Laguna Beach, California destroyed well over a dozen homes on Thursday—including five multimillion-dollar mansions—a prominent environmental researcher and advocate warned that the wealthy are not immune from the disastrous effects of the climate emergency, even as the fossil fuel-driven crisis harms the poor disproportionately.
“No matter how rich you are, you are not safe from Earth breakdown,” tweeted Los Angeles-based climate scientist Peter Kalmus, a member of Scientist Rebellion.
Emphasizing that it is still May—months before the wildfire season typically reaches its peak—Kalmus said that “the only way out” of Southern California’s historic drought is to “fight side by side and to strip power away from the rich corporatists who are leading us deeper into catastrophe, even as their own homes burn.”

Horrific’: Israeli Forces Attack Mourners Carrying Casket of Shireen Abu Akleh

Horrific’: Israeli Forces Attack Mourners Carrying Casket of Shireen Abu Akleh

Israeli soldiers on Friday brutally beat Palestinian mourners carrying the coffin of longtime Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh, who was killed earlier this week while covering an Israeli military raid on a refugee camp in the occupied West Bank.
London-based artist Khadijah Said shared Al Jazeera’s footage of the assault by the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF), describing it as “one of the most horrifying things I’ve seen.” 
Nick Dearden, director of U.K.-based Global Justice Now, said that the IDF’s “horrific” attack—which included the use of stun grenades, tear gas, and batons—showed “an apartheid state in action” and “should be front-page news everywhere.”  https://bit.ly/39oi6Je

‘Our House Is Truly on Fire’: Earth Now Has 50% Chance of Hitting 1.5°C of Warming by 2026

Our House Is Truly on Fire’: Earth Now Has 50% Chance of Hitting 1.5°C of Warming by 2026

 The World Meteorological Organization warned Monday that the planet now faces a 50% chance of temporarily hitting 1.5°C of warming above pre-industrial levels over the next five years, another signal that political leaders—particularly those of the rich nations most responsible for carbon emissions—are failing to rein in fossil fuel use.
                           “For as long as we continue to emit greenhouse gases, 
                temperatures will continue to rise.”
In 2015, by comparison, the likelihood of briefly reaching or exceeding 1.5°C of global warming over the ensuing five-year period was estimated to be “close to zero,” the WMO noted in a new climate update. The report was published amid a deadly heatwave on the Indian subcontinent that scientists say is a glimpse of what’s to come if runaway carbon emissions aren’t halted. Thus far, the heatwave has killed dozens in India and Pakistan.   Read More

Global Climate Coalition Tells Biden Ukraine War Is Chance to ‘End the Fossil Fuel Era

Global Climate Coalition Tells Biden Ukraine War Is Chance to ‘End the Fossil Fuel Era’

 Over 520 organizations told President Joe Biden on Wednesday to urgently “end the fossil fuel era” and commit to a rapid renewable energy transition rooted in justice and a more peaceful world.
“This is the opportunity of our lifetimes to stop the violence of fossil fuels and build a new era of peace and justice to confront the climate crisis.”
The demand was delivered in a letter that points to a “cascade of emergencies” currently facing humanity including the climate crisis and Russia’s ongoing war in Ukraine, which “share the same dangerous thread: dependence on fossil fuels.”
“Russia’s invasion into Ukraine is fueled by their fossil fuel extraction power, and the world’s reliance upon it,” the signatories, including global groups like Climate Action Network International and 350.org, wrote

CIG to control future renewable assets in new policy

CIG to control future renewable assets in new policy 

 The Cayman Islands Government is seeking to take control of the country’s future green energy resources through majority ownership of new solar or other renewable energy facilities. Premier Wayne Panton announced the major new policy direction on Wednesday at a forum in Miami, when he outlined the goal for government and the public to have the majority shares in any new infrastructure, allowing Cayman to reap and retain the benefits of renewable projects and control of future energy supplies.
Panton’s revelation came during a special conversational section at the Caribbean Renewable Energy Forum, in which he delivered the keynote speech. Afterwards, he told CNS that the details of how this will be achieved have not yet been ironed out, but he said government will be engaged in some form of private partnership with operators of renewable facilities that will see the public control the majority stake.

Heat-resilient “super corals”: Nature Seychelles setting up aquaculture farm for future corals

Heat-resilient “super corals”: Nature Seychelles setting up aquaculture farm for future corals 

 Nature Seychelles, a nonprofit organisation, is planning to set up a land-based aquaculture coral farm on the island of Praslin to produce more heat-resilient corals, which are better engineered to adapt to continuously rising ocean temperatures.
The organisation’s chief executive, Nirmal Shah, told SNA that such a project will be more advantageous than an ocean-based nursery or farm.
“By growing corals in an aquaculture facility, we will be able to produce more corals and faster. We can also produce corals that we have experimented with. We want to train the corals to become more resilient to heat as this is the problem corals face at the moment,” said Shah.
Corals all over the world are increasingly dying due to the continuous rise of sea temperatures as a result of climate change.
Shah explained that it is more urgent for Seychelles matters as waters of the western Indian Ocean are warming up at a faster rate, causing corals to bleach faster.
When corals bleach, they expel their symbiotic partners, types of photosynthetic algae, causing the corals to be deprived of their nutrients and, as such, die off. 

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